COVID-19: Yes, we are open! See how we're protecting the health of our customers and protecting their property.
CLICK HERE

The end of the summer season is here and fall is upon us, which means that bugs will be trying to get into our homes for warmth. This is precisely why insects are so annoying at this time of year. Many people experience ant infestations, and that is the best case scenario. Many insects are at the end of their lives, and naturally, they will do anything in order to survive. If surviving means infesting and damaging your home, then insects will do just that.

Some insects are not interested in invading your home. Some insects will overwinter as eggs or pupa. Some insects survive beneath the surface of water, and other insects simply make it through the winter as adults. Luckily, during the winter, insects are not much of a concern to us anymore. However, until the first frost accumulates, insects will continue to pester us for a place to stay. Many insects prefer human dwellings as opposed to the cold conditions outdoors. For example, ladybugs serve as a good example of indoor dwelling insects that are spotted in small corners of peoples’ homes during the winter. Once one ladybug has secured a safe and warm spot somewhere in your home, commonly your attic, the ladybug will invite its friends by releasing pheromones. These pheromones help hundreds of other ladybugs pinpoint the warm location. Eventually a mass of ladybugs will take shape. They are known for huddling together in order to generate body heat.

Of course, the brown marmorated stink bug is another particularly unwelcome, yet common, winter guest in many peoples’ homes. Despite how numerous these bugs are, they are actually invasive pests that were first discovered in the United States back in 1996. Since then these smelly bugs have spread in all directions of the country. Hope that you get ladybugs instead of these nasty customers.

Have you ever found an insect in your home during the dead of winter? If you have, then what type of insect was it? Did you dispose of the insect/s?

 

Stay up to date with the latest information and deals!

Twitter

Facebook

Google+