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As a kid you probably could not get enough gummy worms, or gummy insects, or gummy spiders. During the nineties, there even existed a popular children’s toy that allowed kids to create their own gummy creepy crawlies. This product was aptly named “Creepy Crawlies,” and it was a big hit among children of the eighties and nineties. A different form of the creepy-crawlies product existed during the sixties, which means that three generations have now experienced the joy of gummy insects. However, this may not be a good thing, as there exists some insects in nature that already look like gummies, and not all of them are harmless to humans.

 

One insect that looks identical to a gummy insect toy or candy is the slug moth, or more specifically, the slug moth’s larvae (caterpillars). Slug moth caterpillars are not found often in the wild, but one man recently found one in a park. This man was probably surprised to see the insect move, as most people who see a slug moth caterpillar likely assume that the insect is a discarded piece of gummy candy. The caterpillar was found in Singapore on a tree in Macarthur Park. This man could not help but to take several pictures of the bizarre insect. The pictures were later posted to the Facebook account of Janice Yang.

 

Although this caterpillar looks more like a sweet-tasting treat than a dangerous organism, it is recommended that people avoid these creatures upon finding them. This is due to the dangers that these caterpillars pose to humans. The caterpillars possess thousands of urticating hairs that it throws into the faces of their prey, or anything that it perceives as a threat. The caterpillar’s shiny coat is what most resembles a gummy candy, but this coat is actually a lubricant that the caterpillar produces from liquified silk. Despite their stinging hairs, human injuries sustained from these caterpillars are rare, as they are not often encountered by people in the wild.

 

If you encountered a slug moth caterpillar would you risk holding it?