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Humans produce a whole lot of garbage. We produce more garbage than we know what to do with. Figuring out how to properly dispose of all of this waste in an environmentally friendly way is not an easy task. So far there has been several bad ideas concerning this problem’s solution. For example, disposing of our garbage in the ocean has not worked out well as many types of marine life end up dying after becoming ensnared in disposable plastic items and bundles of garbage. Some of this garbage finds its way into our stomachs when we eat fish. Today, a large island of trash has accumulated in the northern part of the Pacific ocean due to decades of using the ocean as a super convenient trash bin. When taking stock of today’s modern environmental issues, the overabundance of trash cannot be stressed enough. Some countries make recycling a legal duty, but trash will continue to accumulate unless we start to experiment with novel methods of green waste disposal. This is exactly how South Korean officials are approaching the problem of waste overabundance. Government officials within South Korea have approved of a new method to reduce food waste. This method involves releasing a certain flying insect near landfills in order to allow the ravenous insects to eat away at the food waste.

 

When the insect known as the ptecticus tenebrifer is in its larval stage of development it prefers to feed on waste. The Rural Development Administration recently approved of a technological and legal framework surrounding the cultivation and use of the waste-eating insects. For years many South Korean environmentalists have been attempting to make use of the insects in an effort to reduce waste. However, the government prevented people from practicing this waste-reduction method, until recently. The facilities where the insects are cultivated are now labeled as waste management facilities. The insects will be released by the millions every day in South Korea.

 

Do you think that other insect species could be useful for degrading waste materials?

 

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